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Alan Rider Papers

 Collection
Identifier: 2011-01

Collection Scope

The collection consists of material spanning Alan Rider’s academic and professional life, including drawings, portfolios, and site plans, as well as examples of Jane Aistrope Rider’s work.

SERIES I: Student and Pre-Professional Work (1952-1956) contains material about and created by Rider while attending the Carnegie Institute of Technology and the Cranbrook Academy of Art. Included is Rider’s 1954 thesis project, ephemera from his time at Carnegie, and a portfolio showcasing his early work.

SERIES II: Professional Work (1961-circa 1995) includes the sub-series Minoru Yamasaki & Associates (MYA) Projects, John Carl Warnecke & Associates (JCWA) Projects, and DMJM Projects. It contains portfolios, publications, correspondence, notes, and copies of drawings related to projects spanning Rider’s entire professional career.

SERIES III. Jane Aistrope Rider (1959 – ca. 1965) consists of three project portfolios (Exhibitions, Gethsemane Lutheran Church, and School Work) one research paper (“K’o-suu Mandarin Squares”), and nine examples of Aistrope’s textile work.

SERIES IV. Photographs (1961- ca. 1995) contains photographic prints and negatives organized as Student and Pre-Professional Work, Minoru Yamasaki & Associates (MYA) Projects, John Carl Warnecke & Associates (JCWA) Projects, DMJM Projects, Personal, and Seattle Civic Center Fountain Competition. The negatives are labeled and housed at the beginning of the series.

SERIES V. Oversized (1953 – circa 1995) consists of academic and professional certificates, bound publications, drawings, and professional portfolios spanning Rider’s entire career.

Dates

  • 1945 - 1995

Creator

Access

Access to the collection is unrestricted.

Use

Permission to use collection materials must be requested in writing.

History

Alan Hamilton Rider was born 18 Feb 1931 in Cincinnati, OH, and grew up in Memphis, TN. During his teens, the Riders relocated to Hastings, MI, where Alan graduated from Hastings High School in 1948. In 1950, he began his studies in architecture at the Carnegie Institute of Technology, completing his Bachelor’s degree in 1953. Later that year, Rider started work towards a Master’s in Architecture at the Cranbrook Academy of Art, which he earned in the spring of 1954.

Upon graduation, Rider began working in the office of Eero Saarinen & Associates in Bloomfield Hills, MI and contributed to such projects as the General Motors Technical Center, Drake University, and Concordia Senior College (under the direction of Glen Paulsen). In 1956, he was awarded the Lloyd Warren Scholarship and the Paris Prize in Architecture for the design of a small college, also supervised by Paulsen. For the next two years, Rider travelled throughout Europe, Africa, the Middle East, India, Southeast Asia, and Japan. His time in Europe was punctuated by post-graduate study at the École Nationale des Beaux Arts in Paris and a residency at the American Academy in Rome on a Fullbright grant.

Following his time abroad, Rider returned to Bloomfield Hills and began working in the office of Minoru Yamasaki & Associates. His designs during this period mainly consist of multiple-family dwellings and university housing. In 1960, Rider and sculptor Glen Michaels entered the Seattle Civic Center Fountain design competition, for which they were awarded second prize. It was also during this time that Rider married fiber artist and scholar, Jane Aistrope.

In the early 1960s, Rider started working with John Carl Warnecke & Associates, marking the second phase of his professional career. From about 1961-1969, Rider assisted with projects in and around Washington, D.C., most notably Lafayette Square, the U.S. Naval Academy, and John F. Kennedy’s gravesite at Arlington National Cemetery.

In 1969, Rider joined the engineering design firm of Daniel, Mann, Johnson and Mendenhall (DMJM) and later became chief designer. While with DMJM, Rider was enlisted to design the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, IL and the Air Force One Maintenance and Support Complex at Andrews Air Force Base in MD, the latter of which earned him a Merit Award from the United States Airforce. Rider continued working in the Washington area until his retirement in the mid-1990s.

Alan Rider passed away on 25 May 2010 in Georgetown, Washington, D.C.

Extent

6.1 Linear Feet (5 MS, 2 OS)

Language of Materials

English

Abstract

Alan Rider graduated in 1954 from the Cranbrook Academy of Art with a Master’s in Architecture. Upon graduation, Rider began working in the office of Eero Saarinen & Associates in Bloomfield Hills, MI and contributed to such projects as the General Motors Technical Center, Drake University, and Concordia Senior College (under the direction of Glen Paulsen). After extensive travel, he completed post-graduate study at the École Nationale des Beaux Arts in Paris and a residency at the American Academy in Rome on a Fullbright grant. Returning to Bloomfield Hills, he worked in the office of Minoru Yamasaki & Associates, focusing mainly on multiple-family dwellings and university housing. In the early 1960s, Rider started working with John Carl Warnecke & Associates, marking the second phase of his professional career. From about 1961-1969, Rider assisted with projects in and around Washington, D.C., most notably Lafayette Square, the U.S. Naval Academy, and John F. Kennedy’s gravesite at Arlington National Cemetery. In 1969, Rider joined the engineering design firm of Daniel, Mann, Johnson and Mendenhall (DMJM) and later became chief designer. While with DMJM, Rider was enlisted to design the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, IL, and the Air Force One Maintenance and Support Complex at Andrews Air Force Base in MD, the latter of which earned him a Merit Award from the United States Airforce. Rider continued working in the Washington area until his retirement in the mid-1990s. The collection consists of material spanning Alan Rider’s academic and professional life, including drawings, portfolios, and site plans, as well as examples of Jane Aistrope Rider’s work.

Arrangement

The collection is arranged into five series: Student and Pre-Professional Work (box 1); Professional Work (Boxes 1-2); Jane Aistrope Rider (Box 3); Photographs (Box 4); and Oversized (Boxes 5-7).

Within each series, the folders are arranged alphabetically, and in the case of Series II: PROFESSIONAL WORK, by the firm for which Rider was working at the time.

Additional Access

An index to the collection is available.

Acquisition

Items were donated to the Archives by Alan Rider’s estate in January 2011.

Related Materials

Cranbrook Academy of Art Administration Records (1981-09)

Glen S. Paulsen Papers (1991-25)

Saarinen Family Papers (1990-08)

Processing History

Hilary Maurin, February 2012.

Creator

Title
Guide to the Alan Rider Papers
Status
Completed
Author
Finding aid written by Hilary Maurin.
Date
February 2012
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin
Edition statement
Resource record created by Laura MacNewman.

Repository Details

Part of the Cranbrook Archives, Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research Repository

Contact:
39221 Woodward Ave.
P.O. Box 801
Bloomfield Hills MI 48303 US